Reason #55: Group Pressure in Mormonism

  An LDS doctrine that had always strongly appealed to me was free agency:  that God respects our right to choose, and that it is our ethic to likewise respect unconstrained choice for all people.  That notion was badly shaken when I was first “endowed” in an LDS temple at the beginning of my missionary service.  Before attending, I was told that I would be making solemn promises or covenants, but was not told what those covenants were, because they were apparently to be discussed only in the temple.  So I was anticipating learning about them in the temple and that there I would choose to take them upon myself.  The ceremony I experienced turned out to be totally uncharacteristic of anything I had ever experienced in the Church.  It was a...

First Reader Review of The Mormon Mirage, 3rd Edition

I am humbled and honored by the first review of The Mormon Mirage, as posted on Barnes & Noble: The Mormon Mirage Clears the Air  by Thresholds Reader Rating:  See Detailed Ratings March 28, 2009: When I began The Mormon Mirage by Latayne Scott I had very little knowledge of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints: The Mormon Church. I thought they were fellow Christians with some odd quirks. This organizations purposely presents the public face that I had seen–one that shares the Christian’s language of God, Christ, and the Holy Spirit. Scott’s book clears the air of that false image, relates her difficult journey, and reveals the truth. Latayne Scott tells the profound story of her spiritual devotion and life-filling involvement...

From Non-Fiction to Fiction

One of the reasons I am beginning to write fiction is perhaps what government officials might call “plausible deniability.” (smile). In non-fiction, even if it is written only third-person, the very inclusion of ideas means that you are giving them some sort of credence; that you are asking the reader to consider a concept and accept or reject it according to your own personal purpose in writing the article or book. Thus the author is reflected in that. But ah! fiction! You can have all kinds of characters who don”‘t have to promote or counter the “point” of the book. One example of this is a character who provides “comic relief.” On the other hand, the characters who drive the plot and the theme of a work of fiction...

Reason #54: Because of LDS Depreciation of Bible Translation

  Second Nephi 29:3 mocks the trust of the Bible believer by having him say mindlessly, “A Bible! A Bible! We have got a Bible, and there cannot be any more Bible,” with the Lord responding by calling such a man a “fool” (v. 6). Actually, says the Book of Mormon, the Bible is so imperfect that, instead of leading men to God, it actually causes them to stumble and gives Satan power over them (1 Nephi 13:29.) The Eighth Article of Faith formulated by Joseph Smith states that the Bible is the word of God as far as it is translated correctly. To this might be added, “And as far as it seems to agree with current LDS theology.”  In my experience, there are only two places where the LDS Church will directly say that the Bible is...

Reason #53 — The warfare in the Book of Mormon

  The Book of Mormon raises questions when we examine its accounts of warfare. Where is evidence of the great mounds of weapons, the steel-smelting operations necessary for their production, and the warfare technologies described in this book?  LDS apologists grasp at straws with their allusions to things that could “possibly” support its scenarios. (One apologist suggested that the steel mentioned in the Book of Mormon could have been from another metal than iron, for instance: another example of redefining the English terms that were the “correct” translation. Other apologists suggest that perhaps the swords were made of really hard wood with obsidian edges.) But no reputable non-LDS scholar has ever even hinted that there is...