FLDS Insights from Janis Hutchinson

The explosive news coverage of the polygamist sect in Texas, where male members consummated their marriages with minor children in the basement of their temple, can now be better understood in my new article, The Mormon Temple Ceremony, which has just been posted to my website at www.janishutchinson.com.  (Click on, What”‘s New?) Besides giving a blow-by-blow description of the First Endowment temple ceremony that most Mormons participate in, including blood oaths they are required to take, in the second half of the article I reveal the mysterious and secretive Second Endowment ceremony called the “Second Anointing” (also referred to as the ceremony that makes one”‘s Calling and Election Sure).  Not many Mormons know about it,...

Reason #13 — The Cult Status of Mormonism (Continued)

LDS apologists of the lower echelons, with a get-out-of-jail-free card for anything they say (their statements aren’t “official doctrine,”) often represent anyone whose opposes the LDS Church”‘s teachings as “heresy hunters” who “gang assault” them. Of particular irritation to them are those like myself who characterize the LDS Church as a cult. Of course, the LDS Church of the past did everything possible to pursue and earn that label with its fiery condemnation of all other churches and its reclusive and clannish practices. However, the use of the word cult (which according to the dictionary can have secular, business, sociological and other meanings besides religious ones) is one that applies to several...

Reason #12 — Cult Status of Mormonism

When I wrote my book, Why We Left A Cult (Baker Books), I interviewed people who had been faithful members of religious organizations that the Christian world would call cults.  The word “cult” has been used a lot in the media to refer to followers of Joseph Smith’s teachings in west Texas:  the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. They believe the Book of Mormon, and count themselves as true Latter-day Saints. Here is a truth about cults that has been higlighted by Warren Jeff’s community, the FLDS.  People who are happy in a cult would never use that word to describe their religious organization.  To such people, the group offers structure, safety, and a rigid worldview that is comforting and defining.  Only as...

Review of Baptism for the Dead

Baptism for the Dead by Robert Irvine, Pocket Books, 1990 Reviewed by Orrin Judd www.brothersjudd.com Hard to Find, But Worth It I’ve long been of the opinion that the distinctive feature of the great hard-boiled private eye story is the hero’s vulnerability. He’s physically vulnerable because both the crooks and the cops distrust him. As a result of which, he frequently ends up being beaten and battered. He’s emotionally vulnerable because he’s alone and prey to falling in love with clients or other women he meets in the course of the case, or at least caring too much about the people whose lives he finds himself involved in. As a result of which, he frequently ends up heart broken. Such are the Quixote-like characteristics that have...

Raid on the Polygamous FLDS Compound

I have been called by a counselor who is dealing with some of the young women who were evacuated from the west Texas compound founded by convicted polygamist Warran Jeffs. Here are some observations regarding that group. I was a faithful member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints for ten years. During that time, I was taught by the Church and fervently believed that, although polygamy had been suspended temporarily as an earthly practice, I would be a plural wife in eternity. The recent raid on the west Texas compound of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has engendered much curiosity about polygamy. Because this church, the FLDS, has the same founder as the 13-million-member Utah-based Mormon church of a similar name,...