Cult Fiction reviews

I have a rather extensive list of novels that deal with Mormonism, beginning with A Study in Scarlet (a Sherlock Holmes mystery) and Riders of the Purple Sage, by Zane Grey. (Admittedly, many 19th century novels are more caricature than description.) Since the list is extensive, I won’t be able to review them all. If you’d like the list, please feel free to contact me through the “contact” button. If you can write articulately and have a deep enough knowledge of Mormonism to evaluate an author’s accuracy and treatment of LDS culture and doctrine, I’d welcome some help with these reviews! Coming up soon: A review of Wayne Capurro’s White Flag, a recently-released account of the Mountain Meadow Massacre.

Reason #2

In my book, Why We Left Mormonism, I explored with other ex-Mormons the “point of departure” that led us to leave that church. For each of us, a different device (radio program, passing remark, and in one case, a forgotten pamphlet discovered in a pocket) led to the final decision. For me, it was something that came not from any anti-Mormon book, nor even from a desire to see my beloved church proved wrong. It came from my lifelong fascination with Egyptology. In the summer of 1973, I had had all the criticisms of the church I could stand from people in my hometown of Albuquerque. I packed my bags and was ready to move back early to BYU for my senior year. I needed comfort and affirmation, so I picked up my favorite volume of LDS scripture. In those...

It’s one thing to leave Mormonism…..

It’s another thing to spend 35 years asking myself if I did the right thing in leaving a church, and a system of thought, that I absolutely loved. This blog will give a year’s worth of reasons why I choose not to return. REASON # 1: The LDS Church has lost its nerve. Where once it had the Bruce R. McConkies and others who weren’t afraid to say that God the Father came to earth in his physical body of flesh and bones and had intercourse with Mary*, the current LDS president, Gordon B. Hinkley, won’t admit to a non-Mormon journalist from Time Magazine the bedrock historical assertion of Mormonism that God was once a man.** *Journal of Discourses, I, p. 51; Joseph F. Smith in Family Home Evening Manual 1972, p. 125-126; Ezra Taft...

What’s a cult? What’s “cult fiction”?

What”‘s a cult? And what”‘s “cult fiction”? Some people think its any religion that”‘s more demanding than their own, or that has elements they feel are “strange.” But this blog focuses on pseudo-Christian cults– those religious groups who claim a connection to the Bible and use mainly biblical terms but who also 1) deify man, 2) humanize God, 3) ostracize the Bible and 4) provide a non-Biblical view of salvation. Of course Mormonism, the religion of my own youth, fits the bill perfectly. And there are many, many Internet sites that give information about Mormonism and other pseudo-Christian cults. Many provide information about books written about Mormonism. But none I know provide information...

Two New Blogs

I’ve been gratified by the response of so many of you regarding this blog. I want to continue to provide “inciteful” topics and Bible study materials here. However, I’ve added two new blogs to this site. The first one, “Cult Fiction,” will meet a need I don’t think is met on the Internet, that is, reviews of books that deal with cults, such as Mormonism, in a fiction format. Hence, “cult fiction.” For instance, one of the first books I’ll review is Carole Whang Schutter’s September Dawn. This is the book based on the extremely controversial new movie of the same name, starring Jon Voight. You’ll find this blog on the bottom menu of the home page of www.latayne.com. The second blog area...