Reason #68 — My testimony on Iron Sharpens Iron

I have been a guest on the Long Island radio program from WNYG, Iron Sharpens Iron, several times.  Here is a link to my most recent interview on that station, in which I discuss the implications of the LDS Church’s first black African General Authority and other issues.

Reason #67: Because it necessitates dependence on current leaders rather than reasoning

  When the LDS Church reversed its policy of denying priesthood to black male members, the announcement left many of the church’s apologists holding the bag.  One example is that of Bruce R. McConkie, an apostle of the Mormon Church and universally regarded by me and other BYU student as the source of  what indeed his book, Mormon Doctrine, purported to be. Bruce R McConkie took the most authoritative information and reasoned from it.  Then, when blacks were grated the LDS priesthood, he had to say: “Forget everything that I have said, or what President Brigham Young or President George Q. Cannon or whoever has said in days past that is contrary to the present revelation. We spoke with a limited understanding and without the light and knowledge...

Reason #66: Because of LDS Historical Revisionism

The LDS Church announced recently the appointment of Joseph Sitati as the first black AFRICAN LDS general authority. Previously there was a black American who was a GA; and if LDS historical accounts are accurate, a previous black leader, Elijah Able, in the time of Joseph Smith. Regarding Able, there is a great deal of confusion on this issue, because while Able was part of decision-making counsels, he was repeatedly denied the privilege of getting LDS temple endowments and kept somewhat under wraps. Why did I never hear of Elijah Able when I was a faithful Mormon, at Brigham Young University?  Because at that time, the LDS Church was still denying priesthood to blacks, and the Able story didn’t “fit.”  Now that they have reversed the...