What I’ve Been Reading

Let’s take a break from polygamy, shall we? Here’s what I’m reading or have read in the last few months: Charles H. Spurgeon’s Treasury of David.  (Ongoing:  I’m almost halfway through. ) Tony Hillerman’s The Fallen Man. Margaret Atwood’s The Penelopiad Irene Spencer’s Shattered Dreams:  My Life as a Polygamist’s Wife American Apocrypha:  Essays on the Book of Mormon Amy Tan’s The Bonesetter’s Daughter Oliver Sack’s Musicophilia Oliver Sack’s Seeing Voices Christian D. Kettler’s The God Who Believes:  Faith, Doubt, and the Vicarious Humanity of Christ The Treasures of Ancient Egypt:  The Collection of the Egyptian Museum In Cairo Joanne Dobson’s Cold and Pure and Very...

Mormon Fundamentalism

If you’re confused about the roots and development of Mormon fundamentalism (the churches who regard themselves as true followers of Joseph Smith and who practice polygamy), there’s a helpful chart at mormonfundamentalism.com. Also, if you’re interested in first-person accounts of what life is like in a polygamous marriage, google the name Carolyn Jessop. There’s a wealth of information online about her, including several London Daily Mail interviews. For more information, see The Mormon Mirage 3rd Edition:  A Former Member Looks at the Mormon Church Today (Zondervan, 2009). Also available as an audiobook and as an expanded-text E-book for Nook, Kindle and other reading...

Insight on the FLDS Mothers

From Janis Hutchinson comes this helpful explanation: Why won't the mothers in the FLDS Church say which of the children are theirs? It may be because in many fundamentalist groups, ALL the women are considered the mothers. I know, that doesn't make sense. But I know, first hand, that in one fundamentalist group in St. George, Utah (The Church of Christ Patriarchal led by John Bryant, of which I was a member for a short time), the principle was this: Since all the women under one roof were considered sister wives, all their children were taught to call everyone of those wives . . .mother. Therefore, while each mother in the FLDS would naturally know which child she actually gave birth to, perhaps they made some covenant to consider all the children...

FLDS Raid

I, like most Christians, am incensed that the children from the FLDS raid have been separated from their mothers.  But I did not know until today the reason for that. Social workers are begging the mothers to acknowledge their children.  But most will not do so.  In the absence of acknowledging certain children as their own, the children can’t just be “turned over” to a random young woman.  And the logistics of keeping over 400 children and their mothers in one place are daunting. Why won’t the women acknowledge which children are theirs?  Here’s a scenario — if a sixteen-year old girl says that three children are hers — how old was she when she was married?  That would implicate her husband, and male authority is...

A Comment from Scott Simmons

When I read your blog regarding the stories of FLDS and others.  It is very clear that I have not experienced the abuse of submission as some have.  Your insight is very valuable in helping me understand the potential for subversion of the truth in the topic of submission. Thanks Scott